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VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.


VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
VW Golf Mk2 With New Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.

Car: 1991 VW Golf Mk2 1.8 Driver

Colour: Black

With some serious rumbling coming from the drivers' side front constant velocity (CV) joint, it was time to get a new one.

Now with this being a late model VW Golf mk2 Driver, it has the 1.8 litre engine fitted, which can often mean confusion when it comes to ordering parts!

As we suspected the local car shop supplied a new (non-GTi) CV for it, saying this was the only one listed for the car. We suspected it might be the wrong part (but had not inspected or removed the old one yet!), so purchased it anyway as they did not have a GTi one in stock.

As soon as we got back, we removed the old CV from the drivers' side of the car, and comparing the two, the new looked shorter! We decided we would fit it anyway to be going on with!

Once it was fitted the wheel looked like it was tipped in at the top. (at least it did to me anyway!)

Having inspected the bushes under the car and seeing that they were all very worn and perishing, we decided to purchase new bushes, but I wanted to also buy a new pair of CV's from elsewhere, making sure the longer versions would be ordered.

Unfortunately we placed the order for the new parts with a third party, and although we told them when it comes to the CV joints, not to order the CV's for the car with Eurocarparts or any other motor factors/suppliers using the vehicles registration, that is exactly what happened!

When the parts arrived this time via Eurocarparts, yet again short non-GTi CV's were supplied to us!!!

After much arguing (not with EuroCarParts, just amongst ourselves), everyone disagreeing that I was correct in saying that this 1.8 Driver should indeed have the GTi CV's fitted.

I said I refuse to fit the incorrect short CV's to this car, but nobody liked that!

After a very heated "everyone against me, computer databases of suppliers are right, you're wrong" debate ...we were getting nowhere!

In the end it was agreed that only a trip to Volkswagen for the part number for the CV for this particular vehicle would end the debate and I was not prepared to fit anything I thought was wrong to the car otherwise.

The next morning I popped round to Volkswagen, they printed off the part number required, but as the part was now discontinued with them, it was time to compare original part numbers to the aftermarket part numbers.

A little bit of googling later and I was soon able to prove without any doubt that I was indeed correct in saying the longer/GTi version of the CV was the one for this car.

Armed with this information everyone finally agreed with me, and I took the CV's back to Eurocarparts for the exchange. Eurocarparts said they had ordered them off the registration, and had not been passed on the info not to order the CV's for the car this way. This time they simply entered the VW Part code into their system and what would you know, a fresh part number popped up. Checking the stock, and this was indeed the longer (GTi) version I had hoped for.

They also replaced the brake discs we had purchased too, but this was simply because the wrong product had been supplied in the right box! A sealed box was brought out, and the correct brake discs were inside.

So now we had new Control Arms (Wishbones), Brake Discs, and CV joint kits, and the rest of the stuff we needed, the brake pads, anti-roll bar (drop) links, were on order. At least now we could make a start.



VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
With an immediate change of Drivers' side front CV joint required, this new one was fitted, even though it looked slightly shorter in appearance!

One of the bearings in the old CV was so rusted dry, it was no wonder the noise was so bad.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
A few days later and with some new parts to be going on with, it was time to eliminate all the worn stuff, and also to replace that wrong length CV that had only just been fitted!

First of all the wheels have to come off to remove the wheel centre caps. Then the wheels have to be put back on and the car lowered back onto the ground so that the driveshaft nuts can be undone, before jacking the car back up once more & this time supporting the car with an axle stand so as to be able to work on it

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
This side was jacked up and supported on an axle stand too, as both sides were going to be rebuilt.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
The brake piston was hung up out of the way, and the brake pads and disc removed. The new CV that had been fitted only days earlier was whacked back off and thrown on the scrap pile, as it did take some serious whacking to remove, and only seemed to be of very cheap quality compared to the original parts. The ball joint and suspension legs were also unbolted.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
The old wishbones were the next to come off.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Even though we only needed to replace the bushes rather than the complete wishbones, the extra few quid it costs to buy complete wishbones is worth it, as DIY removing and fitting of bushes can usually prove to be nigh on impossible.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
The anti-roll bar bushes are well worth replacing too when you are going to this much trouble.

Removing the anti roll bar at this point is so easy, it would seem daft no to.

The anti-roll bar had a lot of missing, loose and flaking paint and was rusting in these places too, so while it's off for an hour and with everyone else gonna take a break. I thought I would treat it to some fresh paint.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
With a very quick, wire brush and a scrape, the anti-roll was treated to some rush remedy for a quick 10-15minutes, (whilst I grabbed a butty!) and then wiped off and sprayed with some red oxide paint.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Very shortly after the red oxide paint was followed by what was left of a can of fast drying matt black.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
We soon had the anti-roll bar back in place using the new anti-roll bar bushes.

The new wishbones were only slightly tricky to get the bolts back into. We had bought new metal sleeves for the bolts that required them, and although we were expecting to experience great difficulty in aligning these correctly to get them fitted, lying under the car and looking upwards with goggles on we had each side completed in just five minutes each. :)

(the bolts were tightened a little but will all get fully torqued up later)

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
This time when we put the new replacement CV on the car (not forgetting to always slide the CV boot on first) it looked like the correct replacement for the original.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
The same process was going on on this side too.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Now the driveshafts had the new CV joints fitted they were put back through the centres of the wheel bearings.

The bolts will be fully tightened later when the wheels (with centre caps still removed) are back on the ground.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Looking at how it looks so far, I think it does look al that bit better for that speedy paint job on the anti-roll bar.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Yeah! More new parts have arrived. We now have the anti-roll bar links and the new front brake pads to go with the new brake discs.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
The anti-roll bar links are fitted here between the anti-roll bar and the wishbones, but they are supposed to be tightened up when the car is supporting it's own weight, so we will ramp the car once the wheels are on (for easy access to do them).

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
A bit of washing-up liquid on anything like rubber bushes always helps to make things much easier to fit.

A small smear of Fairy Liquid (we only use Fairy Liquid) allows the rubber bushes to simply and easily slide onto the anti-roll bar.

Without using any wash-up, trying to install dry rubber bushes is one hard fight!

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Every car always looks a thousand times better when you put some shiny new brake disks on.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
The brake pads and calipers are fitted and the jobs all done!

Well almost, let's not forget we still have a few things left to tighten!

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Once the wheels were put on, the driveshaft nuts were tightened and the centre caps popped back on.

Then the car was driven onto ramps so that the anti-roll bar links and the other bolts on the wishbones could all be fully torqued up.

VW Golf Mk2 Wishbones, Bushes, and CV Joints.
Back on the road and all that remains is for the car to be driven easy for the first few miles to make sure everything settles down okay. The disc brakes and pads will need a couple of hundred miles on them before they are fully bedded in.

The difference is immediate though in that the car drives along making about as much noise at the front now as a goldfish!

The car was making more noise than an excited and clapping seal beforehand!




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